All posts by Ruth

This morning I was privy to a conversation in Tesco Express that got me thinking. An older generation lady (for the purposes of this blog, let’s call her Elsie; she looked like an Elsie…or maybe a Hilda) was ranting (entirely good-naturedly) to the slightly bewildered cashier, about what the world was coming to, after said cashier informed her that they didn’t sell raisins, sultanas and dried fruit peel.
No prizes for guessing what Elsie’s making. Other customers gazed in bewilderment at this rare sighting of an actual real-life hot-cross- bun-maker. So, Rumblechatters, where do you sit in the make-your-own versus buy-them-in debate? And are you well informed as to the origin of this yummy food tradition?

I’d always blithely assumed that the origin of the hot cross bun was fairly clear cut – a Christian tradition celebrating the end of lent, utilising lots of tasty, forbidden by lent ingredients to make a yummy cake/bread cross-breed, stamped with the cross of crucifixion. In my head this was going to be a quick one – bit of history, bit of religion…job done. But no my friends, it appears that there is far more to the humble hot cross bun than meets the eye.

Did you know, for example, that way before the Christians staked their claim to the HCB, Pagans were merrily worshipping their goddess Eostre (after whom Easter was named), by serving up tiny, fruity, cakes, often decorated with a cross at their annual spring festivals.

The English word ‘bun’ evolved from the Greek ‘boun’, which was used to describe a ceremonial cake of circular or crescent shape, made of flour and honey and offered as a periodical thank you to the gods.

Superstitions regarding bread baked on Good Friday date back to pre-christian times, when people believed that bread baked on this day could be hardened in the oven and kept all year to protect houses from fires, sailors from shipwrecks and crops from perishing

So, given that the humble HCB is not actually that humble, imbibed as it is in a steep tradition of religion, history and culture, should more of us take a leaf out of Elsie’s book and get Good-Friday-Baking…or is this just another example of a time-consuming tradition best circumnavigated the modern way – by buying one and getting one free in a supermarket?

Don’t even get me started on the Easter Bunny!


For the whole month of March, Malaysian artist Hong Yi, known simply as ‘Red’ will be uploading a piece of food art onto instagram.

So far, the artist has uploaded a sushi replica of Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ and a banana headed Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream’. We love it! Click here for the story so far, and keep a look out on Design Boom for the rest of the month’s offerings. Then if you fancy playing with your food yourself, please tweet us your creations!


You may have seen our recent tweets about RumbleChat’s expansion into lifestyle as well as food. Ths is in response to popular demand, as recent RumbleChats have revealed that your good taste also extends to lifestyle products too. So this week’s blog is a little bit crafty! But also foodie 😉

Here are a few demonstrations of how to upcycle your drinks bottles, cans, salt shakers and tins into delicious looking pieces of art and crafts. DIY 101+ ways to upcycle your cans and bottles

If this is getting you all excited, then upcycling can be extended to anything and everything. Check out this article for tasty ways in which you can upcycle old lampshades, bed parts and random trash!

Let us know what you think about our new changes by tweeting us @RumbleChat!

This week we thought we would concentrate on sourcing some amazing recipes for the special lady in your life – your mum! It is of course Mother’s Day this Sunday, so why not celebrate by cooking up a storm in the kitchen!



Of course a great way to show mummy just how much you love her is with breakfast in bed. Our favourite is Egg in a Nest. You simply get a biscuit cutter (a heart or flower shaped one will work well for this occasion) and cut the middle out of a piece of bread. Then you melt a knob of butter into a hot frying pan and place the bread in, frying it slightly. Then crack an egg inside and fry to your mum’s liking. There you have it: Egg in a Nest. Otherwise known as Egg in a Saddle, Egyptian Egg, One Eye or Bird in a Nest!



This classic combo of beetroot, salmon and horseradish creme fraiche makes a delicious starter, but works just as well as a Mother’s Day lunch as well. This recipe is great!



A classic Mother’s Day dinner would have to be roast lamb. It’s perfectly spring like and such a treat. This recipe that we have found gives lots of great tips on how to cook the best roast lamb from chef Marcus Wareing.


Last night saw the 85th Academy Awards, so we thought we would take a foodie spin on the glamorous ceremony! What do you get when you mix films with food? We could discuss overpriced popcorn if you like, but we thought we would recommend a few foodie films for you to enjoy!

In no particular order:

Chocolat. It’s got Johnny Depp and a lot of chocolate… What’s not to love?!

Julie & Julia. This charming true story follows blogger Julie Powell, who decides to cook her way through chef Julia Child’s cookbook “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” The incredible Meryl Streep plays Child, with Amy Adams playing Powell. It’s a sweet tale of dreams, passion and cassoulet!

Ratatouille. This Oscar winner (best animated film) is adorable, and a great family film. It follows a chef, who just gets everything wrong, and the relationship that he forms with a rat who helps him learn to cook.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Again, depending on the version, we have Johnny Depp and chocolate again, but in my humble opinion, the original is the classic.

Let us know your foodie film favourites by tweeting us @RumbleChat!

The Super-Duper Leek!


Leeks are very much in season at the moment, so we thought we would give you RumbleChatters a few interesting facts before you go off to make some leek and potato soup! (of which there is a GREAT recipe for right here)

Leeks are one of the easiest plants to grow in your garden.
They are a member of the same family that onions and garlic belong to.
They remove remnants of other food in the stomach, thereby cleansing the digestive tract and detoxifying the body.
Leeks are nature’s antiseptic agent. If you apply leek extract to a wound, it can prevent infection and also help to heal the wound faster, as they prevent blood clotting.
Leeks are rich in calcium, iron, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin C and potassium.
They also help the symptoms of PMS, and help to regulate the menstrual cycle.
Leeks are known to also relieve the symptoms of epilepsy.

Overall they are a super-duper food! Hurrah for the humble leek! Tweet us with your suggestions of how to cook the delicious vegetable 🙂


It’s that day again… for some it represents religion, for some it signals the beginning of Spring and for some it is a reminder that Easter is on its way. For us at RumbleChat HQ it gives us the opportunity to gorge ourselves on some delightful pancakes! However you enjoy them, we want to know! Tweet us today with your suggestions. Or if you need a bit of inspiration, check out these delectable recipes! #foodporn!

Pancakes with mascarpone and fruits

Duck pancakes with hoisin sauce

Crepes Suzette

and finally…

American Breakfast Pancakes


Just seeing the pictures of these tents from Fieldcandy reminds me that the festival season is approaching. Which gets me so excited! Winter feels like it’s been dragging on for about 5 years, and it’s about time we had a few months of half decent warm weather.
For me, festivals mean music, flat beer, wellies, running out of loo roll, but ultimately, they mean FOOD!
Tacos, pizza, burgers, noodles: anything that will fit in a paper bowl. And there’s something about eating outside in the dying summer sun that makes your food taste all the more delightful…
If you’re planning on enjoying a few nights away in the open air, why not enjoy festival season even more with one of Fieldcandy’s glorious food tents!


I’ve been reading this week about Japan’s culture of cute… especially when it comes to food. The Japanese encourage their children to enjoy meal times by cutting food into interesting shapes, creating characters out of food, and keeping food colourful and interesting.
Even their favourite cartoon characters are food-based! They have Anpanman or ‘Bread Man’, who superhero powers are allowing starving children to take chunks out of his face. Then there’s Hannari Tofu, a cartoon character made from your favourite meat-alternative.
Over at RumbleChat Towers, we find this concept interesting. We know you readers are big foodies: you live to eat, not eat to live. Many people who love food use it in a multi-sensory way. These days, people don’t just enjoy the tastes, but people suck up the smells, the textures, the sights and even the sounds of food! But taking the Japanese way of using food as a form of entertainment, I urge you to take it that one step further – have FUN with your food. Go back to your childhood and eat some popping candy. Have a super hot gob stopper that burns your mouth and turns your tongue blue. Then once you’re done, send us a tweet @RumbleChat about your fun foodie experiences!
Get silly with your food! It’s just all too serious these days!


This article from the Telegraph demonstrates ways in which we can change our diet to keep ourselves youthful, both inside and out.
This includes replacing your morning caffeine hit with ginger tea, rye bread instead of wheat, almond milk instead of diary, fish instead of red meat, no starch after 5pm and a lot less alcohol.
How many of you RumbleChatters out there have been on a detox this January, and have you enjoyed the experience? Was it easy to cut out all those naughty vices like sugar, alcohol, starchy carbs and bad fats? How do you feel now we are approaching the end of the month? A lot lighter, brighter, and full of energy?
Let us know what you did during your detox by tweeting @RumbleChat with #detox!