All posts tagged Art

Taste.  Now that’s a word with many meanings. Whether it’s the sensation of flavour perceived in the mouth, a small portion, a person’s liking for something, or the ability to discern good quality or high aesthetic standard, the concept of ‘taste’ is something that permeates modern life.

The most obvious association is food, but it extends to many areas of a Rumblechatter’s life.  You can have good taste or bad taste. But I’m assuming that, by virtue of you reading this, you fall firmly into the former camp.

Food-wise, there is a scientific explanation as to our preferences. When food and drink are placed in the mouth, taste cells are activated and we perceive one of five flavours: sweet, salty, savoury, sour, and bitter.

Sweet and salty foods were originally nature’s way of rewarding us for eating something nourishing.  There are natural sugars and salts in fruits and vegetables and all carbohydrates are broken down by our bodies to produce sugars that provide the main fuel for bodily function. Natural salts play a necessary role in regulating the pressure of all bodily fluids. Obviously in this day and age, a packet of Walkers Salt and Vinegar followed by a slab of Dairy Milk don’t really offer the same nutritional value, but still, it’s good to understand the origin of our (my?) comfort food cravings.

The taste of savouriness is derived from the natural protein component of foods like meat, cheese and mushrooms.  The main function of protein in the body is to build and repair cells and tissues – pretty essential, in anyone’s book.

Sour and bitter flavours work in the opposite way. Originally they alerted us to foods that might be toxic or harmful to us. Sour foods tend to only be good for us in small amounts. Take for example, the humble lemon. Whilst it has many beneficial attributes, such as antibacterial, antiseptic and supporting liver function, you couldn’t eat a whole one now could you? Bitter foods are ones that may be toxic, and so our taste buds (and dour, lemon-sucking faces) warn us immediately.

Vegetables, although very healthy, do have a component of bitterness to them. This is thought to be from a cunning kind of bitterness camouflage to delude predators into thinking said plant is toxic . Also, some of these bitter ‘toxins’ may actually be deadly to one animal species but another may have adapted to be able to digest these same ones.

Human beings developed innate taste preferences in prehistoric times.  In constant danger of starving, humans developed instincts to shun the plentiful but bland vegetables in favour of the extremely rare, overly sweet, high-fat treats such as honey, grubs, or bone marrow fat, which would sustain them in a famine. Our love of The Great British Bake Off shows that we really haven’t evolved that much

When it comes to aesthetic taste, well that’s a whole different ball game, and one grounded in sociology, not science. Sociologically speaking, taste is an individual’s personal and cultural patterns of choice and preference. Taste is about drawing distinctions between things such as styles, manners, consumer goods, works of art etc. and relating to these.

Aesthetic preferences are predominantly influenced by education and social origin. Different socioeconomic groups are likely to have different tastes. Social class is one of the prominent factors structuring taste. This theory suggests our parents and childhood experiences have a profound influence over our mature aesthetic taste.

I can confess I’ve just bought a green Egg chair that has definite echoes of an orange one my parents had in the seventies. But that’s as far as the shared taste goes.  For me the influence seems to have been more about driving me to create something different.  I’m pretty sure my abhorrence of all things matchy-matchy (in fashion, soft furnishings, décor…in fact, in anything) stem from my mum’s obsessive love of the very same thing?

The other pertinent thing about taste is that everyone thinks they’ve got it.  Just as no-one holds their hands up to being a bad driver, so no-one confesses to having appalling taste.  Which is probably a good time for a confession…I’m actually a terrible driver.

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For the whole month of March, Malaysian artist Hong Yi, known simply as ‘Red’ will be uploading a piece of food art onto instagram.

So far, the artist has uploaded a sushi replica of Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave’ and a banana headed Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream’. We love it! Click here for the story so far, and keep a look out on Design Boom for the rest of the month’s offerings. Then if you fancy playing with your food yourself, please tweet us your creations!

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Last night saw the 85th Academy Awards, so we thought we would take a foodie spin on the glamorous ceremony! What do you get when you mix films with food? We could discuss overpriced popcorn if you like, but we thought we would recommend a few foodie films for you to enjoy!

In no particular order:

Chocolat. It’s got Johnny Depp and a lot of chocolate… What’s not to love?!

Julie & Julia. This charming true story follows blogger Julie Powell, who decides to cook her way through chef Julia Child’s cookbook “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” The incredible Meryl Streep plays Child, with Amy Adams playing Powell. It’s a sweet tale of dreams, passion and cassoulet!

Ratatouille. This Oscar winner (best animated film) is adorable, and a great family film. It follows a chef, who just gets everything wrong, and the relationship that he forms with a rat who helps him learn to cook.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Again, depending on the version, we have Johnny Depp and chocolate again, but in my humble opinion, the original is the classic.

Let us know your foodie film favourites by tweeting us @RumbleChat!

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I’ve been reading this week about Japan’s culture of cute… especially when it comes to food. The Japanese encourage their children to enjoy meal times by cutting food into interesting shapes, creating characters out of food, and keeping food colourful and interesting.
Even their favourite cartoon characters are food-based! They have Anpanman or ‘Bread Man’, who superhero powers are allowing starving children to take chunks out of his face. Then there’s Hannari Tofu, a cartoon character made from your favourite meat-alternative.
Over at RumbleChat Towers, we find this concept interesting. We know you readers are big foodies: you live to eat, not eat to live. Many people who love food use it in a multi-sensory way. These days, people don’t just enjoy the tastes, but people suck up the smells, the textures, the sights and even the sounds of food! But taking the Japanese way of using food as a form of entertainment, I urge you to take it that one step further – have FUN with your food. Go back to your childhood and eat some popping candy. Have a super hot gob stopper that burns your mouth and turns your tongue blue. Then once you’re done, send us a tweet @RumbleChat about your fun foodie experiences!
Get silly with your food! It’s just all too serious these days!

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Check out this extraordinary art exhibition entitled ‘Strange Fruit’ by artist Sarah Illenberger.
She takes an everyday food object and transforms it to represent an everyday object. A beetroot turns into a glamorous ruby, a pear becomes a lightbulb, and a pineapple is transformed into a sparkly disco ball!

What would you make if you were allowed to play with your food? Tweet @RumbleChat with #foodplay with your suggestions!

I would turn a chicken drumstick into a boxing glove, a leek into a palm tree and a block of Stilton into a crumbling cliff edge (!)

Let us know what you would make 🙂

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Ever wondered what high-res fried eggs would look like, stuck onto your living room wall, surrounded by your favourite art-deco lamp that sits on top of your faux-Victoriana side board?! If this sounds like a designers’ idea of hell, well it’s true, you can now adorn your home with wallpaper printed with images of food. American retailer Spoonflower sells rolls of the stuff, and you can buy anything from bacon, to sweets, to cakes.

I think I’ll stick to my magnolia thanks.

Take a look at this amazing photography exhibition of tiny plastic people amongst real food environments. It’s adorable, clever and foodie. And we like foodie don’t we RumbleChatters?!

Artist Christopher Boffoli created this world when he realised there has been an age old fascination for the miniature and the gigantic going as far back as Jonathan Swift’s tale of Gulliver’s Travels. He explains that his inspiration came from the fact that when you are a child everything is out of proportion… From tiny, detailed Matchbox cars to enormous, chunky Mars Bars… (which when you get to adulthood you are convinced have become smaller!)

Anyway, enjoy taking a look at this gorgeous exhibition!

This may just be the most random blog posting that RumbleChat have ever made, but it made us laugh all the same! This, um, tasty looking portrait of MJ is a creation by artist Cristiam Ramos. He uses an assortment of sweets, including gummy bears, M&Ms, licorice and peppermints for his artwork.

However, what we find even more impressive is the price that Mr Ramos sells his works for… we’re talking upwards of $18,000!

So are these works of art actually more than just a brightly coloured piece of edible popular culture? Are there intentional connections between the celebrity, mass culture and artificial, processed sweeties? Or are they just pretty cool?! Check out this portrait of Marilyn Monroe to decide…