All posts tagged content marketing

hoverboard

I don’t know about you, but it’s taken me a while to find my 2015 stride.  I mean, it’s hard to believe that we’ve finally reached the year that Marty Fly visited in Back to the Future II. So it turns out that we don’t have flying cars, there isn’t a female US president and hoverboards are not the favoured transport of the younger generation.

The film did, however, accurately predict handheld tablets, 3D movies and video conferencing. In comparison to 1989, when it was made, the technologies of today are unrecognisable and far-fetched.   But as with everything, the progress has snuck up on us gradually. We don’t bat an eyelid at Google glasses and Skype is pretty run of the mill these days. It’s easy to dismiss how far we’ve come.  The advances in marketing since 1989 are even more radical. Our industry changes so rapidly and hindsight nearly always provides a glaring missed opportunity or ‘could have done better’ moment.

So, how to grab the marketing bull by the horns in 2015? My top tip would be to stop chasing marketing trends and take some time to design a strategically driven marketing mix for your business. It can include several compatible strategies and merge traditional and digital channels to produce the perfect brand-oriented marketing blend.

It may sound obvious, but successful content marketing is reliant on a content marketing strategy.  This strategy is essential. It guides your otherwise eclectic content marketing efforts and is the cornerstone to digital marketing success. Whereas content was undeniably king in 2014, in 2015 it will take on a more presidential role.  By which I mean it is pivotal to all your communications, not just an insubstantial figurehead. Make sure that you are investing in content creation and curation.  You can no longer afford to ‘wing it’, using an ad-hoc/when you’re not tied up with other things approach.

Let’s not forget that the bastion of content marketing is a customer-centric vision.  In 2015, our ongoing quest is to improve the customer experience.  Customers these days are incredibly aware of their worth, and empowered by the knowledge that a single complaint on social media can have a costly impact on a brand.

So, in a nutshell, the best way to apply this to your content marketing is:

  • Get personal – connect, engage and listen intently.
  • Customise – where possible make sure your content is always relevant to your target audience and tweaked for brand relevance.
  • Entertain – within reason, you can’t go wrong if you’re entertaining your customer.
  • Build brand ambassadors – they will be worth their weight in gold.

The other key aspect of marketing in 2015 is to ensure that you THINK MOBILE FIRST. Smartphones and tablets made up 60% of total digital media time spent in 2014 (up 50% from 2013). 2015 looks set to build on this, as analysts are predicting that by 2017, mobile will represent 91% of all internet use.

The key learning here is to keep mobile users at the forefront of your mind in terms of all website updates and marketing communications. If you ensure that you keep the customer front of mind in all your marketing activity you should avoid falling foul of 2015’s big bombshell…DIGITAL DISAPPOINTMENT. Digital natives are the most spoilt and demanding customers ever.  Find a way to make meeting their digital expectations the core of your business and you might just be onto a winner.

Bells and whistles are all well and good, but sometimes, when it comes to content, simplicity is still best.

It always comes back to your brand.  If you’ve got an edgy, hi-tech product aimed at the youth market, then by all means, knock yourself out with the all singing, all dancing (quite literally) video mash-ups.  In this crowded, competitive market, image is everything and your status on the Coolometer is what differentiates you. If however, yours is a more sedate, middle-of-the-road product; a staple, non-luxury item, then the Ronseal approach is often still the way to go.

I mean you wouldn’t expect Apple to take the same approach to content marketing as Tena Lady would you? The key is never to lose sight of your brand values.  They are what your customers have bought into in the first place and what you want their word of mouth recommendations to focus on. All of your content output needs to work hard at reflecting and reiterating these.

Keep a consistent voice, that reinforces your brand personality and talk to your audience(s) using the tone and channels that they like best. Don’t fall prey to what a colleague of mine used to refer to as the ‘my sixteen year old daughter says…’ phenomenon.  What he meant was the tendency of older, senior executives to pretend they’ve got their finger on the marketing pulse by latching onto observed teenage behaviours, regardless of whether they are brand relevant.

You can Instagram and Google+ away to your heart’s content, but if you’re trying to sell commemorative plates to the over-seventies, you are barking up the wrong tree.

Now, that’s not to say you shouldn’t try something new. Some behind-the-scenes SEO copywriting on your website, and a welcoming, insightful blog are just as relevant to the silver surfers as the Playstation generation. You just need to understand your audience and select your content armoury accordingly. Simples!

google_hummingbird

Google has recently made some pretty significant changes to its algorithm – the system that it uses to order its search results.

Known as ‘Hummingbird’, this update is a game-changer for content marketers. Martin Harrison, co-founder of online copywriting service Copify discusses these changes and what you need to do in order to stay ahead of the curve.

 

A change in search behaviour

The way that people are using Google has changed dramatically over the past few years. Historically, most users have entered very generic terms, known as ‘keywords’ to find what they were looking for.

Today, however, users are increasingly entering very detailed and specific queries. For example, a year ago, someone looking for somewhere for an all-you-can eat Chinese restaurant in London might have searched for:

“Chinese restaurants in London”

Or maybe:

“All-you-can eat Chinese London”

Today, they might be much more specific

“Where are the best all-you-can-eat Chinese restaurants with good reviews in London?”

Answer questions

Hummingbird is about understanding user queries and searcher intent. Marketers will be rewarded for understanding the common search queries their customers might have about their products and services, and structuring content around these queries.

A really easy way to do this, for those with Google Analytics set up on their sites, is to search for all queries that have driven traffic with one or more of the following words:

 

  • Why
  • How
  • What

 

More diverse content

 The types of links that were easy to attain in order to propel your site to the top of Google no longer work, which means that marketers must now box clever in terms of the content they produce.

 Updating the company blog once a fortnight with some mundane news about your brand is not going to cut it any more. Those daring enough to be humorous or controversial will be rewarded with the all-important likes and shares that will lead not only to increased brand exposure, but also the type of links that will make a tangible difference to your sites position in the search results.

Invest in visually striking multimedia content that can be enjoyed on a variety of devices, including infographics and video.

good-infographic

 

 

 

Blog

noun

  • a personal website or web page on which an individual records opinions, links to other sites, etc. on a regular basis.

verb (blogs, blogging, blogged)

  • add new material to or regularly update a blog:it’s about a week since I last blogged
    • ·   [with object] write about (an event, situation, topic, etc.) in a blog:he blogged the Democratic and Republican national conventions as an independent

 

To Blog or not to blog?  That is the question.  You think you should, but you’re not entirely sure why, or how to go about doing it successfully.  Sound familiar? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Lots of our clients start off this way… and end up with fabulous, engaging blogs that deliver competitive advantage to their brands.

So for those of you who want to, but need a bit of guidance, here’s my quick and tasty recipe for a perfect blog (peppered with the obligatory food puns):

Key Ingredients:

Content is King. It goes without saying that great content is imperative. In fact, I’d go as far as to say. Good content is well researched, well written and pertinent to the target audience.  If you have something original at your fingertips then you’re at a distinct advantage, but if not, don’t fret.  Just make sure that your take on what may well be a tried and tested topic exudes brand personality and adopts a perspective that resonates with your target audience.

The Perfect Title. The title should seduce your reader but also aid your SEO and therefore, your audience’s ability to find you.  So whilst tongue-in-cheek, witty and hilarious titles are good in one sense (the reader seduction angle), unless you’re very clever, they might be counter-productive on the SEO front. If you can achieve both, that’s brilliant (and you can probably stop reading now as you’re clearly a blogger extraordinaire)

The Ronseal approach to an Introduction. I.e. It does exactly what it says on the tin. The internet reader is notoriously fickle, with an attention span only slightly longer than that of the proverbial goldfish.  Your clear, yet simultaneously compelling title therefore needs to be followed by a concise, revelatory introductory paragraph.

Make the Format Accessible. Meander-y, verbose streams of consciousness may have earned Virginia Woolf literary adulation, but it doesn’t cut the mustard  for the modern day blog. Language should be simple, easy-to-read and to the point.

Size isn’t Everything.  Or length I should say.  Between 500 and 800 words is perfect – long enough to concisely present your content, but not too waffle-y and snooze-inducing.

Invest in Aesthetic Appeal. It’s not shallow.  Looking nice is important…in blogging terms at least.  It’s an integral part of the user experience and another factor in the ‘you-versus-all- the- other -bloggers –out- there’ contest. Make your headers bold and enlarged, your key points stylistically pertinent and stay on-topic and on-brand. Add images to break up your text and illustrate your point.  You can even throw in a video or two to really spice things up.

Let Your Brand Personality Shine Through. Don’t lose sight of why you’re doing this.  Whilst your blog can (and should) be on a wide range of relevant topics that interest your target audience, remember your aim is to increase engagement with your brand.  You want to create a brand voice that people want to listen to and want to hear more from.

Little and Often. Once you’ve started blogging, you need to make sure you keep at it.  From an SEO perspective, the need for regular updates is obvious. From an engagement perspective it’s just as crucial to keep on keeping on. Once you’ve attracted people to your blog, you want to keep them coming back.  Regular updates are the best way of doing this.  I always find it disappointing when I check out a new website and their latest blog was months (or even years) ago.

Preparation time

With a bit of practice you should be able to knock up a simple, commentary-lead blog in an hour whilst a research-based blog might take you a morning.  Given the resultant increase in engagement levels you can surely spare the time?  If not, why not outsource it to professionals.  Our blog-writing service is extremely competitive, costing from just £25/blog.

Here’s one I prepared earlier…

Well, I didn’t actually prepare them myself, and there’s more than one, but I’m sure you get my drift.  Here are a few of my favourites to get your creative juices flowing:

http://www.theskintfoodie.com

http://www.cocoandme.com

http://eatlikeagirl.com

http://www.goop.com (controversial I know but I have to confess I do quite like it)

 

Content-Marketing-Image-Credit-ADMA-Blog

Step 1

Write your content (or get someone to write it for you if you’re short on time or writing just isn’t your thing).  Make sure it’s written well, as poor copy can seriously damage your prospective customer’s perception of your brand. Which leads me seamlessly into a little plug.  If writing isn’t your forte, do think about outsourcing it.  Our team of experienced marketers can write killer copy for your brand for a lot less than you imagine.

 

Step 2

Make it great – your content that is.  By this I mean take care to ensure it is well written, engaging, informative and up-to-the-minute. The internet is awash with mediocre content and in order to win the attention and engagement of your target audience you need to do better. When it comes to content marketing, you need to bear in mind that you’re competing not just with brands with a similar offering to  yours but with everyone who is creating content that appeals to your target market.  I realise this can be make it  extremely daunting. Your content needs to be first rate….which leads me back to that plug!

 

Step 3

Vary the format of your content. A picture speaks a thousand words.  As does an infographic or a video. A well-chosen visual can enrich your content offering no-end. The key to success is to offer a well-rounded mix of different content themes and formats. Test these different content types and themes to see which work best for you.

 

Step 4

Create something new.  Or if that feels a bit too impossible in your field, at least make sure that your spin on the topic is fresh and adds value.

 

Step 5

Create a likeable and engaging voice for your brand. To be honest, getting this step right can often help you simultaneously conquer Step 4. It’s often not what you say, but how you say it that attracts followers, fans and other types of loyalty.

 

Step 6

Be consistent in providing frequent updates.  Once you commit to content marketing there’s no looking back.

 

Step 7

Create a content calendar.  No successful content marketing strategy is complete without an editorial calendar. An editorial calendar formalises your plan to regularly output quality content. This consistency is the key to SEO-friendly, effective content marketing. You want Google and your readers to anticipate your content – creating an editorial calendar, and adhering to it, means you never disappoint.

 

Step 8

Create viral-friendly content. Although I’m not convinced there is a bona-fide formula for creating viral content, there are definitely ways to improve your chances.

 

Step 9

Last but not least…Promote your content.  There is absolutely no point whatsoever in following all the previous steps to creating great content, if you don’t tell anyone about it. Social media is a great forum for this.  Social media and high quality content work hand in hand to increase engagement and drive traffic to your website, where you can then start to convert it into customers.

 

Step 10

Marvel at the increased engagement levels and sales that are the natural result of a successful content marketing strategy.  Not technically a step this one, but a ten-step guide feels much more aesthetically pleasing than a nine-step version…don’t you think?!

 

scandinavian-interior-design-showroom-in-stockholm-2012-2

The broad brush definition of Content Marketing is any marketing format that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire customers. So the formats that immediately spring to mind are blog posts, website updates and email newsletters, right?

In my opinion, the essence of content marketing is far broader than this.  It’s a strategy, not a tactic, and should actually encompass every single communication that your company utters online, including job adverts, one-to-one emails and absolutely anything you write on social media sites and forums.

Content marketing is one of the best ways of engaging with audiences and potential customers online. It is useful for improving search rankings, increasing brand engagement, loyalty and visibility and for facilitating social sharing and interaction. If you are a consumer-facing company, it is imperative that you  are actively embracing content marketing.

People in-the-know have even gone as far as to say that content marketing is the new SEO.  A big claim, but one that makes sense.   Content is the undisputed king in 2013. High quality content targets relevant keywords, boosts social sharing and increases the number of indexed pages on your website, all of which aid your search ranking climb.

Significantly, the focus for content marketing is not on selling, but rather on communicating with customers and prospects.  So it’s really all about improving your communication strategy and making sure you are communicating with your target audience on the right platforms, with relevant information, using a tone of voice that endears you to them.

What I’ve said so far obviously applies to any consumer facing company. But if you’re a food or lifestyle company you’ve got a distinct edge on the content marketing front and I’ll tell you for why (Gavin & Stacey repeats on Gold, anyone?).

Chances are your product is way more aesthetically pleasing than the majority out there.  People love to drool over images of food or beautiful interiors.  There’s a reason TV is flooded with food porn (Masterchef, The Great British Bake Off, Nigella) and house porn (Grand Designs, anything with Sarah Beeney).

They (those in-the-know bods again) say a picture speaks a thousand words. So you are at a distinct advantage in having access to delicious images that your audience will want to see.  Of course, you don’t want to be just firing incessant pictures of your brand at them, but having this content in your locker gives you a natural foundation for your content marketing efforts.

So what are you waiting for?  If you’re not quite sure where or how to start then either give us a call or pop back next week when my blog will give you a step-by-step guide to Content Marketing.